Tatiana Sulovska
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Tatiana Sulovska

Tatiana recently left LA for NYC, thus suddenly pizza became pie and freeway congestion was swapped for subway delays. This had no effect on her film preferences. Her heart belongs to art house cinema. All time favorites: My Own Private Idaho (Gus Van Sant), The Mirror (Tarkovsky), Drowning by Numbers (Greenaway). She is currently pursuing a J.D., holds a graduate degree in international relations, worked as a journalist, accounting manager, and interpreter.

Movie ReviewMovies

What gives this film unexpected warmth, is the enthusiasm, the gentleness and care with which these people speak of the dance company’s founders Robert Joffrey and Gerald Arpino. At the core a story of perpetual struggle reveals itself.

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The quality of the animation was quite astonishing – the level of detail was marvelous, the rendering of the 60s and 80s was distinct not only in pertinent period paraphernalia, but also by creating two very different atmospheres for the narrative’s present and past arcs. A lot was achieved through the use of color and its saturation to distinguish the portions of the story not only on the time axis, but also providing them with a different emotional charge. Isao Takahata as both the director, and screenwriter, has produced a subtle story with universal appeal, quiet and subdued, and truly very memorable.

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Movie ReviewMovies

This animated film itself is like a wave, a wave of nostalgia, that is. World of adolescence opens up, and adults are magically reminded what they cared about as children, and why they cared so much. The subdued quiet quality, yet high precision of the animation work makes the experience almost tangible.

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Seeing PINA made me realize just how stale Hollywood is. Wenders discards conventional narrative, appropriates the language of movement, using one visual art form to bring forth the immediacy of theatre and the physicality of dance to create a transformative experience. Indeed, this is art, not craft, with its power to transcend, rather than just entertain.

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More than anything, L’AGE D’OR is an assemblage of saturated, unrelenting images, a full frontal assault: the clouds floating in the mirror. Oh. The cow on the bed, chased away, like a dog. The servant girl screaming and falling on the floor to remain motionless, as the room explodes with flames, all ignored by high society, that cannot have their party disrupted. A cleric in full robes; a burning fir tree ablaze so much so, you can hear the crackling echo through the years that separate you from the date the shot was taken; a plough – all being defenestrated by a madman. And then, off course, there is the ubiquitous giraffe.

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What I know about the Balkans, I did not learn from Jolie’s In the Land of Blood and Honey. Don’t get me wrong, the film astonishes.   The movie does extremely well in forcing an understanding of the immediacy of war onto audiences.   War is something that could happen

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By Tatiana Sulovska   Almodóvar’s most recent movie THE SKIN I LIVE IN (La piel que habito) may leave his admirers surprised, but a double take is very much what this movie deserves.   Stunning visuals are likely what holds the most allure for American audiences, as the director seems

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